Saturday, 7 June 2014

The Weather is Changeable

Gentle Reader ~~~ the weather is very changeable.  Another year brings the same question: "What has happened to Spring?" for here we are in early June and yesterday I kept the heating on for most of the day!

~~~They say it is the wettest Spring on record {with more rain to follow} but we haven't had that much rain here, or so it seems. 
~~~They say it is the third warmest Spring since records began {I love that "since records began" ~~~ I often wonder when did 'records begin' ~~~ it makes me smile} but where?  Certainly not here, for I am still wearing winter layers and the heating is on every evening. 

Well, there isn't much we can do about it, but it gives us something to talk about ~~~ as if we need encouraging?

Last night, a band of thunderstorms swept up from the south across most of Britain.  We were in the earlier barrage, so by morning the worst of it was gone and I awoke to sparkling clean windows ~~~ one more job off the list then ~~~ for nature sometimes has a way of helping with the housework.  The day was grey, then it brightened up a tad, greyed over again and played with us, teasing us with sunshine from time to time, but now the sun is definitely here to play.  The garden is glorious, freshly washed from the rain, all bright and beautiful in the brilliant sunshine, dancing gaily in the slightly too stiff a breeze which is cooling things down maybe a little too much for such bright sunshine.  Long sleeves still needed, too cold for shorts.  Not that I wear shorts, but if I did it would not be warm enough today.

I never fail to be amazed at how quickly weed seeds grow, certainly the appear to sprout out of nowhere overnight into nearly full grown plants, and so much more quickly than things I want to be growing ~~ like my vegetables!  Why, it is less than two weeks since I cleared a patch for my courgettes {when they are ready for transplanting} and about the same time I sowed my courgette seeds, on May 26th.  So, here is the patch {which I covered with a scrap of netting to stop cats scratching around in it} and look how green it is already ~~~


These are the Franchi Seeds of Italy courgette/zucchini 'Romanesco' that I particularly like for their deeply ridged skins and buttery yellow flesh that, to me, is quite superior in taste ~~~


Courgette seeds have a pointy end and a rounded end, they say to sow with the pointy end up and the rounded end down for better germination, so this is how I sowed two seeds to each pot {later, the weaker of the two will be pricked out} hoping for 6 plants in all ~~~


As many of you know by now, I love to recycle, re~purpose, and re~use and this is re~purposing of those horrible filmy bags used in so many supermarkets these days, tied on tightly to make a free propagation unit, with a ready meal plastic tray as a saucer ~~~


 Then, today ~~~ Yay! the first tiny seed has pushed through the soil into the world! 


On now to some pretties for you to feast your eyes upon ~~~

I love my Verbascum, also called Mullein, and this is my dwarf verbascum that comes back every year.  I hope one day to be able to divide it, for it is a favourite of mine ~~~


















A pink osteospermum with yellow and teal coloured centre ~~~


A gorgeous, tight rosebud ~~~


that opened into this beauty ~~~


The Oriental lilies are slowly opening to reveal their bright orange vibrancy ~~~


Oh, and one of my favourites, the rambler Frances E Lester, starting to open ~~~ I gave it a very hard pruning earlier and thought there would not be many blooms, but, oh! my! there are hundreds of clusters this year, I cannot count them, and there are thousands upon thousands of blooms like this to open!  I wait, with eager anticipation to see them later in the Summer ~~~


Rosa Rugosa, another fragrant favourite ~~~


 Laburnum, golden and dancing, overhangs from a neighbour's garden, I get the benefit for free! ~~~


and finally, a real hairy beast!  Would you just look at this poppy bud? ~~~


 So, Gentle Reader, my words are done, my images today are shared ~~~ more will follow soon, for remember that ~~~


~~~A Gardener's Work Is Never Done~~~

15 comments:

  1. Debs, beautiful colors and lots of eye candy! Lovely 'borrowed views' can enhance and expand one's own space, without the added maintenance. Your rambler Frances should be stunning in full bloom. Here in southern Alabama, near the Gulf of Mexico, our weather is reaching the 90s and humidity levels shorten my time outdoors. The extent of my gardening consists of pruning back tree limbs and shrubs, and potting up the occasional flower or herb; although yesterday I enjoyed playing with a fairy garden! I must confess that most of my gardening exists in my mind ... {sigh}

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    1. Thank you Sharon. That rambler will look spectacular in a few weeks. I garden a bit at a time, not to pull my back again {which put me out of action for 8 weeks last summer} I'd love a fairy garden. One day, maybe?

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  2. Debs, your wet, warm weather has your garden thriving! Can't wait to see your rambler in full boom! Enjoy your neighbor's Laburnum. It looks just like liquid sunshine! I've never seen one here, in the Chicago area. I'm heading out to weed the paths in my herb garden. The weeds are growing so quickly here, too! Thanks so much for inviting us into your garden! ♡

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    1. It sure beats watering, but there was too much water over the winter and much is lost. Lovely as the laburnum is, it is the reason I cannot have chickens {yet} as it is highly poisonous. Yes, weeds grow like, well, weeds :D hahaha!

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  3. I just loved my "tour" of your garden...Always a treat! Alas, living just across the bay from Sharon (posted above), the deep South heat and humidity keep me indoors much of the growing season (a good 7 months out of the year). So, *travelling* across the pond to enjoy yours is a delight! I love the pink osteospermum, all of those beautiful colors in one bloom!! ~ Donna =)

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    1. Hello my friend! Thank you, I'm always happy to have visitors to my garden. I do feel for you and Sharon that you cannot get out in that humidity, for I remember summers in Virginia too well. I wonder how osteospermums would do with you? They thrive on neglect, so it wouldn't matter that you cannot tend them and are native to South Africa. Debs xoxo

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    2. "Drought and neglect"? Then osteospermums are just the flowers for me!!! I will try and find them on this side of the pond. Might go nicely with my lavender once I find the variety ("Phenomenal") I am looking for. ~ Donna =)

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    3. I have tried to Google it for you in North America and have found one link http://all-americaselections.org/winners/details.cfm?WinID=567. Also Google "African Daisy" which is the common name. http://gardening.about.com/od/plantprofiles/p/Osteospurmum-Growing-And-Caring-For-African-Daisies.htm has Zone information {which I don't understand but you will} They are so easy and some of mine have reached over four feet in circumference! Big plants which then look spectacular and give fantastic ground cover/weed supressing! D :)

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    4. Oh, thank you! I will hop over there and check it out and also look for them at my local garden centers! ~ Donna =)

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  4. I always enjoy a look at your garden! Mine is doing very well this year. As are the weeds!! LOL! I am in an eternal war with those darn weeds. They always seem to win. :-)

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    1. Good Morning my dear friend~~I think there will always be weeds~~a rose growing in the wrong spot is technically a weed! I think it is time to embrace our weeds! Debs xoxo

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    2. Yes, I think you are right! And I have been pulling out wild roses...they are coming up in places I do not want them nor have the room for them. They grow with abandon at the edge of our property.

      I have grown osteospurmum here in Ohio, but it only came back for 1 year. I think I had it in a too shady spot. They are pretty!

      I wish you a wonderful week ahead!

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    3. I must confess, letting things grow where they are in the way of other things is one of my failings. I have great trouble pulling out something that has picked that spot for a home, so my garden is often a mixing pot of things that decided for themselves.

      One thing to do, when you buy a new plant, is look it up and see where it is from. That will give you plenty of clues as to the best place to plant. D xoxo

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  5. Hello Debs... oh, your gardens are beautiful!... I love see all of your flowers that the rains have helped along... and I love that you grow your own courgettes!... I call zucchini that too, maybe as I am half French... I love them simmered with crookneck squash in a little butter and garlic... I also have an African Daisy... and yes, they thrive in the heat!... mine is on our back deck, full hot west sun, little water (maybe a half inch a week) and flourishing... much love to you across the pond!... xoxo Julie Marie

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    1. Hello Julie Marie Thank you for your kind words ~~ I find courgettes so under~rated ~~ I think they are beautiful and delicious additions to the Summer and early Autumn table. My recipe for chutney will, hopefully, follow with images as it is cooking. Since I posted this on Saturday I now have nine seedlings, the first ones are rocketing along! Debs xoxo

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Thank you for stopping by today ~ I love reading your comments