Sunday, 29 March 2015

And So March Goes Out Like A Roaring Lion ~~~

Gentle Reader ~~~ The old adage of which I spoke some twenty nine days ago did not come to pass ~~~ for March, which came in like a lion, is leaving us with the power of a full pride of roaring lions as winds of strong gale force sweep across the country, battering us from every angle and bringing much torrential rain for many ~~~ my poor camellia "Debbie" is doing a very merry dance in the corner ~~~

Before I forget ~ as I am very wont to do ~ I'd love you to go visit an wonderfully charming entry in Susan Branch's Blog called "The Elf, The Gnome, and The Naked Leprechaun" and as you scroll down, look for the incredible tromp~l'oeil painting by the very talented artist Margot Datz.  Isn't that amazing?

I did promise an effort to return to the garden, and it is taking great effort this year to leave my books and mugs of hot, steaming tea and cakes, my warm and cosy fireside, so here is a gentle ease back into the gardening saddle ~~~



Debbie the Camellia has done very well this year, full of bright and beautiful pink blooms, cheering up the end of Winter and helping herald in sweetly, soundly sleeping Spring {who has yet to realise that it is her time to shine} ~~~ maybe her nose is out of joint at losing an hour as the clocks sprang forward an hour this weekend ~~~



I love the complexity of the petals as they fold in and around each other ~~~



and there are many tightly closed buds that will ensure many more weeks of this splash of colour in the corner ~~~



I love how these ones cascade through the deeply dark and glossy leaves ~~~



how others peek from behind ~~~



or push their blousy way to the fore ~~~



So pretty ~~~ I'm getting all swoony ~~~



however they behave ~~~



there is nothing shy or retiring about this shrub full of ballerina pink tutus !



A magnificent display ~~~




Did you know that the camellias we grow in our garden for their beauty, structure, and colour are related to the very same camellias that are harvested to make my, and maybe your, favourite beverage?  Tea! 

I have another camellia too, this one flowers later and so is only just coming into bloom. It is red, so quite a contrast, and here are some of the flowers that have opened ~~~








Is it any wonder that another name for this beauty is the Rose of Winter?

The sharper eyed amongst you will notice that the blooms and leaves are quite different between the two, and you can read a little about Camellias here on the RHS Website.

There was a sweet surprise waiting for me in an abandoned border ~~~ a small clump of the most magical double daffodils!  Aren't they just the most magical blooms ever for Spring {although everything is pretty magical about Spring} ~~~





The unsightly stalks behind are the remains of last Autumn's Wind Anemones that gave a magnificent display of white flowers, bobbing in the Autumn breezes ~~~ 





With the forecast of strong winds and heavy rain, I picked the flowers which were already showing signs of distress, for the stems are not quite strong enough to support such a heavy bloom, and brought them inside. I am delighted to say that they have already lasted four days indoors, which I really did not expect them to do, for they had been in full bloom for over a week in the border!



The moon is waxing in the evening sky ~~~


and the days are lengthening noticeably.  Soon I will be able to snatch a few hours in the garden during the evening too! What bliss that will be ~~~ Why! I do declare I think I love gardening best of all as the sun is setting to the west ~~~

The lawn has been mowed for a second time, with a lower cut again. My neighbours have told me to cut back anything of theirs that overhangs my fence, so earlier this week I set too and attacked their sycamore saplings and ivy that is turning into the tree kind. My garden waste bin was full to overflowing and I had so much waste that I cannot compost that I was relieved when a neighbour offered me a lift to the Community Recycling and Refuse Amenity Center {also known as The Tip} Another neighbour offered me space in his garden waste bin as his was less than half full, so I have successfully removed almost everything.  I have thoroughly cleaned underneath two blackcurrants and a gooseberry and now must make decisions over the future of the blackcurrants.  Piecemeal clearing has also commenced in several borders. Spring is definitely on her way ~~~ and I must be ready when she gets here!

Remember that 

~~~ A Gardener's Work is Never Done ~~~

20 comments:

  1. Yes like you I can not wait to catch some time in the garden in the evening but I will have to put my knitting a side to do that.
    Your photo's are beautiful, I love seeing gardens come to life.
    Fondly Michelle

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    1. Thank you, Michelle ~ the garden is a wonderful place in the evening, the light plays magically on everything. Maybe you can sit a while with your knitting too?

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  2. Oh Deb, I'm in love with your lovely flowers. I am anxiously awaiting my garden to bloom. We are having quite a cold snap and some winds that probably are pale to yours. My camellia is a red one, but somehow my squirrels think it is for their consumption. The rascals eat the buds before they can open! Your Debbie Camellia is one of the prettiest I've seen. I love how full and lush the pink petals are! Your double daffodils are just lovely. My double ones have not bloomed yet! Thank you for sharing your lovely garden! ♥

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    1. Thank you Martha Ellen ~ patience is something every gardener needs! I think we are all biting at the bit now, the winter is on the wane, Spring should be here and who needs squirrels in their garden?

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  3. We have a red camellia that looks very similar to yours but we bought it as an nameless variety. At the moment the flowers of just one half of the bush have opened and the others are still tightly closed. The flowering side faces the afternoon so if we get any that is.

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    1. Hello Sue ~ our red one has no name either, but un~named varieties are fun as they are often marked down and you get a lovely surprise. The red one is slowly catching up now.

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  4. Your Camellias are gorgeous! I tried to grow them last year, but the plants were too small to sustain the nibbling by the deer. You have so much in bloom already. Everything is beautiful.

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    1. Good Morning Cathy ~ oh, that is such a shame. We do not have deer as a problem here, but in turn we have other things. The only issue with the camellias is the wind, and just this week our neighbour cut down his hedge so once again our garden demography has changed. Always a challenge in the garden!

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  5. ..It's so wonderful to hear from you Deb! I'm just back from work and your beautiful photos and catchup was such a lovely welcome Home. Thankyou, Loragene

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    1. Oh! It is wonderful to hear from you, too, dearest friend! I'm happy to have made you smile today ~~~Deb

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  6. Love the red one the best. The contrast between the dark green shiny leaves and the blood red flower is super. Still much too cold here for anything to poke it's head through the soil.

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    1. We could use it in flower at Christmas! Wind has been our enemy this winter again. Patience is a gardener's virtue!

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  7. You have really been busy in the garden, Deb! It must be such a good feeling to see the garden slowly taking shape for the new growing season. Camellia 'Debbie' is just breathtaking! I love the bright pink ruffles! Do you cut your Camellias to bring inside? Wouldn't it be lovely if I could find a Camellia 'Debbie' for my garden? I will also search for the Wind Anemones that I fell in love with last Autumn. Today we had cold rain, hail, and strong winds… but Spring is on the way. I can just feel it! Can't wait for our first blossom! Thanks for another lovely post. Have a wonderful week, Deb! ♡

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    1. Thank you Dawn ~~~ I don't cut my camellias for indoor use, only the fallen blooms {of which there are too many now in the wind} for floating in a dish of water. The do not last well at all. Yes, I remember you do love the Wind Anemones! ~~~Deb

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  8. Another lovely post! What beautiful shrubs you have. I wonder if I could grow them in my area? I will definitely have to check that out. I'd love to have such beauty in my yard to enjoy. I did check out the link you provided about them.

    I checked out the other link, too. Wow, what talent Margot has! So completely amazing. Thanks for providing the link.

    I am so glad you were able to get rid of all the garden waste you had. I know that is a problem for you sometimes. I am glad I don't have to worry about it like you. One of the perks of living in the country. I haven't been able to get out yet to do any gardening. We just had more snow. But a warm-up is supposed to come this week. I sure hope to be able to play in the dirt some.

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    1. Thank you Darlene ~ Hmmm, you will have to check them out, for I think your winters are much worse than ours when they are at their worst. We seldom have snow, but they have survived the weather we had in December 2010 but that was nothing compared to yours. Camellias in light snow are stunning!
      Finger's crossed that is the worst of the garden waste dealt with now! ~~~Deb

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  9. Hi Deb,
    I just knew you were busy in the garden! (See message I left Saturday on your last post.)
    I love camellias, and I do have a bush someone before me planted; however, it has never bloomed. It is a very big bush.
    Have you ever seen a peppermint camellia? Beautiful! Blooms in winter.
    I have never seen double daffies. I love double blooms of all kinds.
    I bow to you for getting all that bed cleaning and pruning done already!
    OOX Margot~~~

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    1. I have never seen a peppermint camellia, so will go and Google now.
      Double blooms are so pretty, but I'm sad to say they are the worst possible things for bees, butterflies, and other garden pollinating insects.

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  10. There are so many lovely blooms - especially in the Spring but I have always liked Camellias

    Have a Happy Easter

    All the best Jan

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    1. Camellias always bring a touch of the exotic to a British garden at the end of Winter!
      Happy Easter to you too! ~~~Deb

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Thank you for stopping by today ~ I love reading your comments