Thursday, 1 June 2017

I'm A Wildflower ~ What Are You?

Hello Friends ~~~

June is upon us ~~~ how did that happen?

I'm giddy with delight ~ it's taken me a long, long time to realise this, but I am a Wildflower! 

How did I come to this? Well, it is simple ~~~ if you know me well, then you will know I'm a wild child and free spirit at heart.  I love nothing better than being out in the countryside, traipsing the byways and hidden paths across the Shire where I live ~ the further away from so called civilisation the better! Although I have cultivated flowering shrubs and perennials in my garden, few things make my heart sing more loudly, or my face smile more broadly, than seeing a wildflower freely give of itself by sowing it’s seed and growing in my garden. It gladdens my heart, spirit and soul to the end of time.


Of course, that all of these natives are of great benefit to bees is icing on the cake, but would you believe me if I tell you that a fortnight or so ago one of my neighbours asked me if I wouldn't mind deadheading the dandelions!  I think you will know what my answer was, that is after I'd recovered from the question!


Please, don’t misunderstand me, I love the perennials and annuals that grow and flower in my garden, and I will always grow them, but it is the wildflowers, the natives, that bring me more pleasure than most {of course, my heart also belongs to sunflowers, lavender, and roses too!}



Right now, my garden is burgeoning into bloom after that ‘green period’ that comes between spring and summer. The rosa rugosa are bold and blousy splashes of deep pink with their saucer sized and deeply fragrant blooms; the hydrangea “Glam Rock” are teasing me daily with progress towards the first fully open flower head; pinks fragrantly flower in cushions, sitting alongside mounds of pink geraniums; Oriental poppies are keeping their buds tightly closed waiting for the first rays of warm sunshine as we sit in a murky mire of days of a stubborn and chilly sea fog; quaking grasses quake and shake across the garden, and every which way I turn there is something putting in its annual appearance, which is confusing because they are all perennials!




 Amongst all these God~given beauties I find the true beauties ~ the wildflowers ~ foxgloves, valerian, native ferns, wild carrot, Alexanders, dandelions, herb Robert, daisies, buttercups, milkmaid's smock, toadflax, and even those aforementioned pinks which, at one time, were wildflowers on the near continent that arrived in this country with the Normans and became cultivated. My list goes on, and every time I find a new wildflower arriving in my garden I welcome it with open arms indeed! 

Milkmaid's Smock

Two Native Ferns


Herb Robert

Stinging Nettle


Mullein

Valerian

Toadflax

Foxglove

Buttercups

 My spirit is wildflower, for as a child I spent many hours traipsing along the lanes and byways in the countryside, accompanied by my Nanna ~ a not inconsiderable gardener herself ~ who taught me all the names of native wildflowers and grasses that decorated the hedgerows along our way ~~~ before I began school I could name every plant, grass and tree around my home  and I had scrapbooks filled with pressed and dried wildflowers, grasses and leaves, all stuck firmly in place with that scourge of all early scrapbooks ~ Sellotape!

Nothing makes me happier than to be in the company of wildflowers; it is a connection to something so deep in my soul that words cannot express that feeling of deepest joy, but those of you who have something that brings that feeling to your own soul will know of what I speak.
  
I have decided that I am going to encourage more, many, many more native wildflowers into my garden, so I shall be looking out for seed packets, maybe harvest some on a walk, or buy some ready grown plants from Wiggly Wigglers who specialise in wildflowers for bees and wildlife. I may even plant a small section of native hedging ~ who knows what this wildflower will get up to next! 

Until next time ~~~
~~~Deborah xo

16 comments:

  1. I have loads of toadflax in my garden that just appeared on its own and has spread throughout my walkways in the gravel and in between bricks. I've transplanted it into pots, too. I love that Foxglove is wild there. I had to buy mine, but I have dug up two volunteers and transplanted them into my garden.

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    1. Toadflax is a bit of a thug! It may be small and very pretty, but it can also take over if left unchecked. Foxgloves seed freely, so I'd scatter a few seeds where you want them as they look wonderful in big drifts. I saw some perennial, sterile ones for sale the other day and thought, "What is the point?"

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  2. A flower is a flower is a flower! I love wild flowers along our highways and byways. On our property I am occasionally treated to the most interesting wilds that have been planted by the wind or the birds or the bees. You have a great assortment of beauties. I love that your Nanna taught you all about them. What a treasure she gifted you. Enjoy your day, my friend. xoxo ♥

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    1. As my Dacu Fach would say "A weed is any flower growing where you don't want it" and I welcome almost all comers! Yes, Nanna gave me a great gift indeed. It's lovely, isn't it, to find a wildflower gifted to your garden. xoxo

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  3. You will understand why I am happy to have no neighbors! �� Love that you are a wild flower!
    Chris W

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    1. I've also got new neighbours on one boundary who've brought in a JCB digger to literally raze the garden, and I am waiting new neighbours on another boundary again! Finger's crossed, eh? Who'd have them? lol

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  4. Well I am a Wild Daffodil as you know, but really, my favourite wild flower is Birdsfoot Trefoil, which has lotus in its Latin name and has a common name of Granny's toenails - Ha! Ha! Ha! I've only just discovered that - my grandkids are going to love that!

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    1. Oh I do think they will have a field day with that one!

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  5. I don't know what type of flower I would be but tell me are you and your neighbour still on speaking terms?

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    1. Ha! Good question ~ let's just say since she complained that there was mud on the driveway it's a struggle to take her seriously, but I'm having a good giggle!

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  6. What a lovely post and photos. Wild flowers are welcome here too - get so thrilled to find that a new species has self seeded. Lovely to read of your nanna - my nana and granpy taught me so much about nature when I was little too - how to identify plants and birds etc. I am forever grateful to them for nurturing my interest and sharing their knowledge :)

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    1. Thank you, yes I am so grateful too, I never knew my Dacu but often wonder what knowledge he would have shared too.

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  7. Beautiful photos. Yes, I can see you as a wildflower. I am a native lover, too. I think knowing that the various bees depend on native plants just cements it for me. Bring on all the native plants and let's get planting.

    Love and hugs,
    Darlene

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    1. Thank you, Dear Friend! I know your garden flourishes with all you plant, so yes, let's get busy! Deb xoxo

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  8. I hear everything you're saying. I've just got very excited because common toadflax has somehow sprung up in one of my perennial beds. It's a majestic looking creature, all spikes and heels. Wonderful!

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    1. Toadflax are such pretty plants, whichever decides to move in, but does need a little control or will take over!

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Thank you for stopping by today ~ I love reading your comments