Monday, 16 March 2015

Éirinn go Brách ~~~ It's Saint Patrick's Day!

Gentle Reader ~~~ today is Saint Patrick's Day. Top o'the Mornin' to you and Éirinn go Brách ~~~

A Wish for a Friend

Wishing you a rainbow
For sunlight after showers—
Miles and miles of Irish smiles
For golden happy hours—
Shamrocks at your doorway
For luck and laughter too,
And a host of friends that never ends

Each day your whole life through!


Although I consider myself Welsh, there is without doubt a soupçon of Irish running through my veins. Mixed emotions were rife in my cottage on Saturday, last, as Wales beat Ireland in the RBS Six Nations and dashed Irish hopes of a Grand Slam, while keeping alive Welsh hopes of the overall tournament trophy. 

Here is the O'Brien coat of arms that my father brought back from a holiday in Ireland, and which hangs proudly on the back of my Irish oak front door ~~~



~~~ or is that a Welsh oak door, as you may read here, thus adding further mystery to my mixed Welsh~Irish roots!


The O'Brien clan motto is Lamh Laidir an Uachtar – "The Strong Hand from Above" and it is said that we are all descended from the Irish King Brian Boru. {see, I knew it all along ~~~ I am a princess!}

There is, as you might expect, much legend born of the mists of time about Saint Patrick, so I will share one of our Welsh legends ~ that Patrick was a Welshman, a contemporary and friend of our very own Welsh patron saint, David, and as many scholars believe, born in Pembrokeshire in Wales. I will leave it for you to decide, but here are a couple of links for you to read at your leisure~~~

St Patrick a Welshman
The most celebrated Welshman in America

Here is my Flickr album of the Shrine of David, Restored which shows the procession and ceremony of the unveiling of the restored Shrine of David. I am proud to say I was one of the five hundred guests at the ceremony. Patrick is depicted, on David's left hand side, on the recently restored Shrine of David at St. David's Cathedral, and local legend says that Patrick left Welsh shores for his ministry in Ireland from either Porthclais Harbour or Whitesands Beach. {one of the two hundred stars in the canopy is dedicated to my late father}

In the meantime, while we do not have the big parades in Wales, or drink green beer {although a glass or two of Guinness will never go amiss} I will be giving a nod to my Irish heritage by baking Irish Soda Bread and serving it, spread thickly with lashings of butter, alongside a dish of my vegetarian interpretation of Colcannon.  As a vegetarian, corned beef is not on any of my menus!


Here is a picture of some Irish Soda Bread I made earlier

Here is the recipe for Irish Soda Bread  that I use. It is a Delia Smith recipe.

My interpretation of Colcannon is simple. I will, in my heavy cast iron pan, fry off in butter and oil some floury potatoes {unpeeled, cut into one inch chunks} with some thickly sliced onions. When those are nearly cooked and all golden and caramelised, I will add some thinly sliced cabbage and lightly toss around until the cabbage is wilted. Simple, and very tasty!


However you celebrate, I wish you all a 
Very 
Happy Saint Patrick's Day






14 comments:

  1. I am sure we all have a wee drop of Irish blood in us some where!!

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  2. Thank you, Deb, for this informative post. The Shrine of David at Saint David Cathedral was quite interesting to me. What a fitting memorial to your father to have a star in his honor. That must mean a lot to you!
    I love your Irish/Welsh oak door--it is beautiful with the coat of arms! I will have to try your vegetarian Colcannon--it sounds delicious. Also the Irish Soda Bread looks similar to mine. I'll be making it tomorrow for St. Patrick's day. It's nice to know a princess! ♥

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  3. Deb, my 4th great-grandmother (born here in Maryland in 1766) on my father's paternal side was born to an Irish father (Shields) and Welsh mother (Williams). She married a Scotsman (Gilleylen) in 1786, so I'm pretty British! The English part (Cook) was introduced in the next generation. I also have some French Huguenot and Dutch from the 1600's mixed in. On my mother's side I'm Hungarian (and whatever Hungarians were before they were Hungarian).

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  4. Your Colcannon sounds delicious. All kinds of Irish ancestors for me and my husband. Happy St. Patrick's Day to you, too. St. Patrick's Day, now Spring can't be far behind!

    Susie Donahue

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  5. Very interesting commentary on Patrick. I hope to have a sup of something Irish in London today. Wine perhaps. Hmmm maybe a long shot!

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  6. Happy St. Patrick's Day to you too Deb!... enjoy your Irish soda bread, yum!... we will be having our traditional corned beef and cabbage... Jack is Irish and it is a tradition at our house. I love all of the history you always include in your lovely posts too!... xoxo... Julie Marie

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  7. Erin Go Bragh, Princess Deb! I always enjoy hearing about your Welsh-Irish roots. Can't wait to try your favorite recipe for Irish Soda Bread. After I convert the measurements, I'd love to give it a try! Deb, I learn something wonderful every time I visit! Happy St. Patrick's Day! ♡

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  8. Hi, Deb ... your St. Patrick's Day meal sounds perfect. Each year I think I'll try my hand at baking the bread, but never do. Your Welsh-Irish roots are interesting. My recent delving into Ancestry.com has me curious about my own heritage; my husband's paternal bloodline traces back to England and Scotland, with some royalty tossed into the mix. Blessings to you and yours . . .

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  9. Happy Saint Patrick's day to you, too!
    What a lovely post, filled with a nice poem and a great oak door that could be Irish or Welsh or Cornish. And lots of interesting history. I do enjoy history. And to find out I know a princess...bragging rights, you know. lol

    Hope you enjoy that delicious looking and sounding meal!

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  10. Happy St. Pat's to you Deb! May the wind always be at your back…
    I made my first corned beef w/ carrots and potatoes yesterday. Next year I will make some soda bread. I bought it this year.
    I too am a princess. LOL My mom said that, because our 3 great grandfather who settled in America was Koenig (In English King.), we must be princesses. Or the other version… Since my great-grandmother from Switzerland was part Habsburg/Hapsburg, we have blue blood. LOL……
    PS To the friends who want to make your recipes…there are metric dry measuring cups in the US, and the glass liquid measuring cups (Pyrex) have both ounces AND milliliters.
    OX Margot~~~

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  11. Oh and you didn't even know that you were actually celebrating my and my Mom's birthday!! Hee hee!
    Well now, I think since we share so many of these common roots (and since you are a princess) That I shall now call you "Cousin Princess Deb" !! :-D
    Have a wonderful week!! Blessings and warmth, Cousin Linnie

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  12. Hope you had a great St Patrick's Day.

    I love that poem at the start of your post........

    When cooking cabbage I sometimes add a little cubed bacon pieces, tastes great.

    All the best Jan

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  13. Last comment didn't stick
    Wanted to tell you how interesting all your blogs are.

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  14. For got to say that I make Irish Soda bread too,but this year I bought it in a Jewish Bakery and it was soo so good.

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Thank you for stopping by today ~ I love reading your comments